Thursday, November 28, 2013

What Happens When We Talk

We look around us these days and what do we see? Everything from hate crimes to misbehaving political leaders. It's no wonder we're becoming hardened to injustice; examples of it are thrown at us every moment of every day. We are, in fact, an information-charged generation; desensitizing ourselves to the vitriol of others – relieved we're not the target. We are told about those who are isolated or victimized because they look different, come from different backgrounds or have different beliefs. And we feel powerless to help. (My, aren't I just a regular ray of sunshine today.)

Then, along comes a man in white robes who tells us it's more important to concentrate on our similarities than our differences. He figures, from what I gather, if we concentrate on those positive things we agree upon, that in itself opens up avenues of cooperation and possibilities to make the world a better place. Working together.

Here's what I have gleaned from his actions and words. Respect different lifestyles. Be inclusive, not exclusive. Denounce a capitalistic culture that evaluates a person on a monetary basis. Stop high-level members of his own organization in their tracks who would bling stuff up to impress others. Tone down the traditional opulent trappings of his own office and drive a clunker. Encourage giving to the poor. Love the afflicted.

Even those of us who don't have religion, or who aren't a member of his particular brand of it, have to admire this shift in perspective from powerful jewel encrusted figurehead to simple, humble servant. One who is noted for his humility, his concern for the poor, and his commitment to dialogue as a way to build bridges between people of all backgrounds, beliefs, and faiths.

8 comments:

  1. Wow, Rand... Well put. I'm not a Catholic, nor do I play one on TV, but your every word is right on (I guess that's a demonstration of the point right there!). And I'm not even annoyed that your post wasn't funny.

    A genuine understanding of what's important in a big-picture, long-term, humanitarian sort of way. A real appreciation for the "Other", and what their situation might be. Asking "What's in all of our best interest?"

    I guess that's what you call "Compassion". You hear the word a lot, but rarely see it being lived.

    Cheers, mate!

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    1. Thanks Raymond. Sorry about the lack of funny. :) I'll make it up to you. Appreciate your humanitarian comment and the addition of the word compassion. Cheers, bud!

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  2. Don´t know if you know anything about what happen in the swedish political arena today? We have a Nationalist party here. The third largest of the ruling parties. So that means that sweden aren´t anymore the best country in the world. To live in. Every day in news they talking about forein people who is beeing hunted. Who they really kicks in when they come and want asylum in our country. The other day sent the TV eight hours of liv TV on the Nationalist Party´s AGM. Eight hours of liveTV. In a working day could Swedish people are fed with crayzy ideas about what should be regarded as genuinely Swedish and what is not.
    So compassion is what we neeed here.

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    1. Thanks Erika. Sounds like a good example of looking for differences rather than commonalities.

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  3. Hear, hear! I think we're on the same wavelength this week. People need to get along and I'm glad the pope is leading a charge. Here's to hoping that people will listen to him.

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  4. I disagree with Raymond. There is some funny in your post. Here's what I copied and pasted:

    Stop high-level members of his own organization in their tracks who would *bling* stuff up to impress others.

    Was that intentional, Rand? it's funny whether you did or not.

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    1. It's all accidental Lynn Marie. Like life! :)

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