Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Freeing Restraints

Recently, a well-respected online friend came "out of the closet" (so to speak) to disclose what he termed to be a "disability".

A group of us have been corresponding with this chap (I'll call him Jeff because that's his name) in discussion threads for going on years and have delighted in his wisdom, wit and intelligence. No one knew Jeff had suffered any type of extraordinary hardship. Far from it.

His comments came out in response to a word someone used off-handedly – in conversation – innocently. Others took exception to the word. Then Jeff posted. His comment was based on the hurt that words command. He was gracious enough to explain that it's not the word that offends, but the intent of those who utter it.

He taught me a lesson today. Thanks Jeff.

Who amongst us cannot claim some personal deficiency? Who are not sensitive to those deficiencies being used for others to feel superior?

The bigger question, I suppose, might be: what would happen to this world if we were to concentrate on what works as opposed to what doesn't?

The handcuffs that society places on all us imperfect people might come off...

7 comments:

  1. We're all beholding, in any language... :o)

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  2. Your words are always so true...meaningful and touching! Thanks for letting us see what we don't always see or in our busy lives, seem to otherwise ignore (not with malice) but perhaps just ignorance in this fast past world.

    Rand...you are the best!!!
    Pam

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  3. An interesting exercise. How to wrap our minds around a social concept, somewhat emotional for sure...

    Thank you Pamela and Traci for your kind comments!

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  4. When I started using a wheelchair a year ago one of the best pieces of advice was "if anyone can't handle it, it's THEIR problem not yours". As a result I never make myself invisible! Not only do I get to find out who does have problems, but I love being eye level with kids. Answering their questions is a step toward making sure they won't have problems with disabilities in the future. LOL!

    Barb

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